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Webmaster | 11. October 2007 @ 16:02

One of the great recreational activities is an exciting and fun-filled tailgating party. It's more than just drinks at the back of an SUV or a truck; tailgating parties are a big hit at any sports event. This is where everyone gets together to celebrate the game, or maybe just for a get together where all of you can have fun, share stories and laughter.

But aside from that, no party is complete without food and drinks. Food is a very important part of tailgating. Make sure your food is in the Safe Zone. If you do not, end run will mean something completely different!

The most important thing to stress about tailgating is keeping the food at safe temperatures. That is below 40 degrees or above 140 degrees. This means ice and a food thermometer are two of your most important aspects of tailgating equipment.

Did you know that between the temperatures 40 degrees and 140 degrees, bacteria grow at the fastest rate? Therefore, the great thing to do is to make sure that you keep cooked meat to their proper temperature and you have kept cold foods under 40 degrees.

High protein foods, such as meat, eggs and milk products must be stored less than 40 degrees. Melons should be washed on the outside, cut up at home, and then stored under 40 degrees until serving. And, the food should never sit out more than two hours if you are taking �takeout� or fully cooked food to an outdoor event. In addition, make sure to keep insects especially flies to stay away from your foods.

Try to estimate how much food you�ll eat at the event. Taking home leftovers is not encouraged by experienced tailgaters. In the end, be prepared and plan.

You might want to consider some of these suggested recipes. They are just simply great and delicious, a perennial favourite of many experienced tailgaters.

For your main dish, grilled shrimp is easy to prepare.

Peel shrimp leaving tail section intact. Pour one small bottle of Italian dressing in an 8 1/2 x 11-inch pan. Place shrimp in pan. Sprinkle a splash of teriyaki sauce on each shrimp. Lightly sprinkle garlic salt across the entire pan. For extra zest, splash lemon on shrimp.

Chill in refrigerator for two - three hours to marinade, then grill for 10 minutes. Turn occasionally for browning effect. Do not overcook, as shrimp will get tough.

For you beverages, you could prepare summer time punch.

Mix 2 cups of water, 1/2 cup powdered iced tea mix, 3 cups orange juice, 1 cup unsweetened pineapple juice, 1/2-cup grenadine, 1 ginger ale and the raspberry sherbet and add a champagne or white wine for extra taste. This will be great drink for your party.

Finally, for your desert, try the apple peach pie. This is just easy: combine a cup of sugar, � tsp of salt and 2 tbsp of flour. Then add 1 tsp of lemon juice, 1 tsp. cinnamon and the sliced apples. Add the top crust add seal around edges. Cut slits in top. Bake it at 425 degrees for 40 minutes and let it cool for 15 minutes.

Before the time has come for the party to start and your friends to arrive, you are already done preparing the foods and drinks. All you have to do is sit back relax and enjoy.

About the author:

Nicola Kennedy has been organizing tailgate parties and picnics for nearly 12 years. Her site TailgaterEssentials.info offers news, tips and great ideas about tailgating parties.

This article may be reprinted in full so long as the resource box and the live links back to TailgaterEssentials.info are included intact. All rights reserved. Copyright http://www.TailgaterEssentials.info.

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Webmaster | 27. July 2007 @ 16:17
What to cook, how to cook it, and what ingredients will meet the standards for various heart-healthy and diabetic-related diets is a challenge in many households. Label reading can be confusing, and finding the balances required to adhere to Canada’s Food Guide is not always easy. To alleviate some of these challenges, public health nutritionists have a number of resources available to help smooth the path between kitchen and table. Information is available on general nutrition, eating disorders, body image and diets, vegetarianism, osteoporosis, sports, heart health and cancer prevention, herbs and alternative medicine. Check out this website for more information including recipes for Big Batch Power Porridge, Barbecued Chicken Salad Sandwiches, Turkey Apple Meatloaf & Baked Granola Apples. :)
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Webmaster | 22. July 2007 @ 16:17

Here are some hints that you might find useful.

- Do not discard over-ripe bananas. Slice and sprinkle it with lemon juice. Freeze it to use later for milk shakes, puddings or banana bread. It will blacken if you refrigerate it.

- If you only need a few drops of lemon juice, puncture a lemon with a toothpick and squeeze out the amount needed. Replace the toothpick. If the lemon is cut, it won't last as long.

- Fresh ginger will stay fresh for months in a freezer if you wrap it tightly in foil.

- To separate the leaves of a round lettuce, hit the core end sharply against the kitchen counter top. The core can be pulled out and the leaves will separate without tearing into strips.

Here is a tasty fish recipe which you can try:

4 cod fillets, skinned
Salt and pepper to taste
150ml dry white wine
1 lemon, sliced
6 tablespoons mayonnaise
4 tablespoons lemon juice
50g capers, chopped

Place the fish in a frying pan and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Add the wine and lemon slices, cover and simmer for 20 minutes.

Remove the fish from the pan, reserving 2 tablespoons of the cooking liquor, and leave to cool.

Mix together the mayonnaise, lemon juice and reserved liquor.

Stir in the capers.

Place the fish in a serving dish and top with the caper sauce. Serve cold.

Serves 4

About the author:Chris Zaaiman

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Health Guru : The Top 10 Quick Tips that will save common household recipes!!!
Webmaster | 12. May 2007 @ 16:17

1. Making great biscuits: biscuits are great from scratch because most recipes use only 5-6 ingredients. My personal recipe uses only baking soda, baking powder, flour, buttermilk, salt, and butter. The most important thing to remember to ensure that your biscuits come out fluffy is to make sure that you use cold butter and that you leave the butter in small chunks throughout the mixing process. A common error is to mix the butter smoothly into the mixture. If you leave the butter in chunks, as your biscuits cook, the butter will form layers in the dough and the result will be more rise and fluff. This also works for making any puff pastry from scratch. Another great idea is to take the dough and put a thin layer over the top of a bowl of soup, then to bake the whole bowl in your oven. This will give your soups a beautifully fluffy top. Of course, make sure that your bowl is oven safe before baking it.

2. Get a really good non-stick skillet: if you're tired of having food stick to the bottom of your cookware, then you really need to invest in a great non-stick skillet. The one that I have only set me back $30 and I can cook an egg on it over easy without any oil and not break the yolk . I'm very partial to Caphalon's commercial lines, but definitely check out Anolon, T-Fal, and Farberware as well. Some other very important features are whether the skillet comes with a cover, whether or not the handle gets hot when it cooks, and how long other buyers have found that the non-stick surface lasts for. Make sure that you don't confuse non-stick with hard anodized. Hard anodized is definitely not non-stick and you'll get very frustrated if you get the two mixed up. The additional bonus of a non-stick pan is that cleaning is really easy. Run your pan under water and most extraneous food will slide off easily.

3. Grilling or pan frying chicken without getting it stuck in the pan: one of the biggest problems with cooking chicken is trying to move it off the grill or pan. The key is to be patient. Use a spatula and wait for the chicken to release, because it will. Of course, if you didn't use any oil then the chicken will most likely get stuck anyway. But all proteins reach a certain temperature where they will release and it's just a matter of being patient and waiting for this.

4. It's never too late to marinate: a lot of people end up eating bland food because they think that they don't have time to marinate their food. Even if you only have less than an hour, you can make a great marinade. Just make the marinade twice as strong, and use strong flavors. Here's a few quick marinades that have worked for me - balsamic vinaigrette, soy sauce and minced garlic, or lemon juice/zest and white wine. Also try using dry rubs such as crushed red pepper and garlic powder.

5. Use kosher salt to season: kosher salt is the what every professional cook uses and there's good reason. Regular iodized salt breaks down right away when added to water. In contrast, kosher salt breaks down slower and delivers a more pronounced flavor to whatever you are cooking. If you want your steaks to taste like steak house quality, all you need is kosher salt and coarse ground black pepper.

6. Extra virgin olive oil is pasta's best friend: after cooking pasta, make sure that you mix the pasta with some extra virgin olive oil immediately. Otherwise, you'll find that the pasta will start to stick together after a short amount of time. Don't ever refrigerate plain pasta without adding olive oil. If you do, you'll end up pulling a big pasta block out of the fridge. Also, when you boil pasta, make sure you add a cup of kosher salt per gallon of water. This is what will give the pasta its flavor.

7. Making amazing french toast: the best way to make amazing french toast is to avoid using regular bread. Extraordinary french toast is made with cakes or specialty breads. Try slicing a pound cake from your local grocery store and turning it into french toast the same way you'd usually do it with bread. Another great idea is to make french toast out of banana bread.

8. Making icing for pastries. Making icing for pastries is one of the simplest secrets in the pastry world. To make icing, all you need is water and powdered sugar. Start with the powdered sugar in a bowl and add water slowly until you get the consistency that you desire. Then just use the icing to make danishes, cakes, and other pastries even more delicious.

9. Keep your kitchen knife sharp. A common misconception is that people cut themselves in the kitchen because their knives are too sharp. The reason for most kitchen cutting accidents is actually the total opposite. When you use a blunt knife, the knife will slide off whatever you're cooking and this when the knife usually cuts your hand. To keep your knife sharp, use a diamond steel and bring your knife down the steel at an 18 degree angle.

10. Cracking an egg without getting shells in the mixing bowl. This seems easy enough, but it's surprising how many experienced cooks still experience the annoyance of getting egg shells in their favorite foods. The way to avoid this is to first gently hit the egg's middle against a hard surface. Then, use two hands to do the rest. If you're right handed, hold the egg with your left hand, and use your right thumb to push the middle in and then pull the egg apart with both hands. If you are left handed, just switch the directions above.

Good luck with your culinary adventures!

About the author:

Jonathan Chin is the editor of intensecooking.com, an online resource that helps regular people connect with great home cooking secrets.

answers@intensecooking.com

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Health Guru : The Basics of Cooking with Wine
Webmaster | 14. April 2007 @ 16:17


We drink wine, placing it in a glass and swallowing without the effort of chewing (even though some people describe wine as chewy). It goes down smooth, born to be only wild enough to glide down an esophagus. Quenching our thirst and our nerves, a glass of good wine is simply a good drink.

However, wine isn't limited to just a glass, a bottle, or even a bucket. Branching out into different realms, as if trying to find itself in the culinary world, wine has become an important ingredient in many food dishes.

Cooking with wine isn't a new concept; a bottle has always been in the kitchen, wearing a chef's hat and saut�ing the onions. But, with more and more light shining onto the health benefits of wine, people are becoming increasingly interested in wine sauces, adding it to dishes for wallop and wellness.

Choosing Between Red Wine and White Wine

Red wine will go with several dishes, as if some sort of food floozy getting on top of everything it knows. While people can alter recipes to make red wine BBQ sauce, or red wine steak sauce, the basic job of red wine is to marinate, bringing out the food's innate flavors. Reds are skilled at bringing out the colors and essence of the food, and they add a dryness, making dishes taste less sugary. Similar to food/wine pairings, red wine should be added to dishes containing red meat, or dishes with a lot of vegetables, such as stews.

While red wine enhances flavor, white wines alter it. This doesn�t mean that white wine will decrease the horrible taste of your mother-in-law's fettuccini, but it adds an acidic feature, making the dish more tart. It won't drastically change the dish, but it will enhance its natural sharpness. White wines are best used for cream sauces, or with chicken and fish.

How Much to Spend

Wine that you cook with should be wine that you would drink�.willingly. This doesn't mean that you should pour your bottle of 1847 Ch�teau d'Yquem into a noodle sauce, but adding in weak wine will hurt, even ruin, your dish. If you purchase a wine of poor quality, your food will adopt that poor quality, which is probably not the goal you're aiming for. A good rule of thumb is to never add cheap wine, but don't go overboard and add an expensive wine that should be saved for a special occasion.

Cooking Wine

Cooking wine, by definition, is a very inexpensive wine that has been treated with salt as a preservative. Its sole purpose of existence is to be added to food. While some people advocate the use of cooking wine, true wine connoisseurs don't, throwing the recipe book at it instead. This, in a nutshell, is because cooking wine tastes exactly like it's supposed to taste: like wine you'd never want to drink.

Drunken Dishes

Some people may imagine that an entree full of alcohol will cause mayhem among the dinette set, causing the dish, in a moment of lapsed judgment, to actually run away with the spoon. But, in truth, using alcohol for cooking won't have as much of an affect as using it for drinking. This isn't to say that all the alcohol in food disappears (some dishes that aren't cooked very long can still have high contents), but the longer something simmers, the more the alcohol evaporates, leaving the dish on the verge of sobriety.

Cooking with wine is meant to be fun and something people can do with a lot of variety. Though the Internet is filled with recipes and directions on how to make specific dishes, a lot of cooking with wine just comes with learning and understanding your specific tastes. In the end, wine can add pizzazz to your meal with flavor and zest, but usually not so much alcohol that you find yourself sauced.

About the author:Jennifer Marie Jordan is the senior editor at http://www.savoreachglass.com. With a vast knowledge of wine etiquette, she writes articles on everything from how to hold a glass of wine to how to hold your hair back after too many glasses. Ultimately, she writes her articles with the intention that readers will remember wine is fun and each glass of anything fun should always be savored.

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