Read Aloud Health Food Blog
Articles on health and food
Front page | Admin |
Sections
All
Annoucement
CT~ Cooking Methods
CT~ Fish
DT~ Slimming Tips
FREE
FT~ Eggs
FT~ Tomatoes
GOGO Drinks
How to write Blog?
HT ~ Acid Reflux
HT ~ Acne
HT ~ ADD
HT ~ Alcoholism
HT ~ Alzheimer
HT ~ Anemia
HT ~ Anxiety Disorder
HT ~ Arthritis
HT ~ Asthma
HT ~ Back Pain
HT ~ Bad Breath
HT ~ Blood Pressure
HT ~ Body Odor
HT ~ Brain
HT ~ Cancer
HT ~ Cerebral Palsy
HT ~ Child
HT ~ Cholesterol
HT ~ Coffee
HT ~ Constipation
HT ~ Depression
HT ~ Diabetes
HT ~ Eating Disorder
HT ~ Exercise
HT ~ Eyes
HT ~ Fatigue
HT ~ Feet
HT ~ Fibromyalgia
HT ~ Hair
HT ~ Headaches
HT ~ Heartburn
HT ~ High Blood Pressure
HT ~ Home Remedy
HT ~ IBS
HT ~ Insulin
HT ~ Kidney Stones
HT ~ Life
HT ~ Liver
HT ~ MD
HT ~ Memory Loss
HT ~ Migraine
HT ~ Optimum Health
HT ~ Protein
HT ~ Psoriasis
HT ~ Raw Food
HT ~ Remedies
HT ~ Rheumatism
HT ~ Scabies
HT ~ Shaving
HT ~ Skin
HT ~ Sleep
HT ~ Sleep Disorder
HT ~ Smoking
HT ~ Snoring
HT ~ Sperm
Ht ~ Stress
HT ~ Sweating
HT ~ Vinegar
HT ~ Water Retention
HT ~ Weight Loss
HT ~ Yoga
HT~ Acid Reflux
HT~ Acid-Alkaline
HT~ Acne
HT~ Addiction
HT~ Air
HT~ Allergies
HT~ Anemia
HT~ Anxiety
HT~ Arthritis
HT~ Asthma
HT~ Athritis
HT~ Austim
HT~ Babies
HT~ Baby
HT~ Back
HT~ Back Pain
HT~ Bad Breath
HT~ Baking
HT~ Balanced Diet
HT~ Bird Flu
HT~ Bodybuilding
HT~ Breast Cancer
HT~ Cancer
HT~ Cerebral Palsy
HT~ Child
HT~ Children
HT~ Cholera
HT~ Chronic Fatigue
HT~ Coconut Oil
HT~ Coffee
HT~ Cold
HT~ Cold Sores
HT~ Constipation
HT~ Cooking
HT~ Cough
HT~ Crohn
HT~ Dandruff
HT~ Depression
HT~ Diabetes
HT~ Diabetics
HT~ Diet
HT~ Diets
HT~ Disease
HT~ Diseases
HT~ Eating Disorder
HT~ Eczema
HT~ Elders
HT~ Exercise
HT~ Eye
HT~ Eyes
HT~ Fatigue
HT~ Fats
HT~ Flu
HT~ FMS
HT~ Food
HT~ Fruits
HT~ Graves Disease
HT~ Hair
HT~ Hair Loss
HT~ Hair removal
HT~ Headache
HT~ Headaches
HT~ Health Insurance
HT~ Healthcare
HT~ Heartburn
HT~ Herbs
HT~ Household Tip
HT~ Hygiene
HT~ Hypothyroidism
HT~ IBS
HT~ Incontinence
HT~ Insomnia
HT~ Joint
HT~ Joints
HT~ Lose Weight
HT~ Losing Weight
HT~ Massage
HT~ Melanoma
HT~ Menopause
HT~ Mental Problems
HT~ Mesothelioma
HT~ Milk
HT~ Muscle
HT~ Nail
HT~ Nail Fungus
HT~ Nails
HT~ Narcolepsy
HT~ Neck
HT~ Obesity
HT~ Optimum Health
HT~ pH Miracle
HT~ Pilates
HT~ Pregnancy
HT~ PTTD
HT~ Red Meat
HT~ Sciatica
HT~ Scoliosis
HT~ Skin
HT~ Skin Care
HT~ Sleep
HT~ Sleeping Disorder
HT~ Slimming
HT~ Slimming Diet
HT~ Smoking
HT~ Snoring
HT~ Stress
HT~ Syncope
HT~ Teeth
HT~ Thyroid
HT~ Thyroidism
HT~ Tinnitus
HT~ Tiredness
HT~ Vitamins
HT~ Wedding
HT~ Weight Gain
HT~ Weight Loss
HT~ Wine
HT~ Woman
HT~ Yeast
HT~ Yeast Infection
HT~ Yoga
HT~Acne
HT~Depression
R ~ Agar Agar
R ~ Cakes
R ~ Cappuccino
R ~ Cooking
R ~ Curries
R ~ Dessert
R ~ Drink
R ~ Fish
R ~ Food Tips
R ~ Italian
R ~ Main Dishes
R ~ Pets
R ~ Pizza
R ~ Pork
R ~ Root Beer
R ~ Smoothies
R ~ Snack
R ~ Snacks
R ~ Sweat
R ~ Thai
R ~ Wine
R ~Main Dishes
R~ Agar-Agar
R~ Agar-Agar (Low Fat Dessert)
R~ Beef
R~ Bread
R~ Cakes
R~ Casserole
R~ Chicken
R~ Chicken Quesadillas
R~ Chili
R~ Chocolate
R~ Christmas
R~ Coffee
R~ Cookies
R~ Dessert
R~ Dessert ~ Malay
R~ Desserts
R~ Diabetes
R~ Easy-To-Cook
R~ family food
R~ Food Recipes for Special Purpose
R~ Fruit Dessert
R~ Gelatine
R~ Gluten Free
R~ Healthy/Diet/Slimming Drinks
R~ Hot Dessert
R~ Ice Cream Recipes
R~ India
R~ Indian Food
R~ Irish
R~ Italian Food
R~ Jewish Food
R~ Kid Food
R~ Lamb
R~ Lasagna
R~ Light
R~ Low Carb Smoothies
R~ Main Dishes
R~ Microwave
R~ Nachos
R~ Pasta
R~ Pets
R~ Pies
R~ Pizza
R~ Pudding
R~ Pumpkin
R~ Rice
R~ Salad
R~ Salads
R~ Seafood
R~ Snacks
R~ Soup
R~ Steaks
R~ Stew
R~ Tacos
R~ Turkey
R~ Yogurt Low Fat Dessert
R~Cakes
R~Low Carb
R~Slow Cooker
T ~ Meditation
T ~ Mosquito
T ~ Oil
T~ Beer
T~ Beer Making
T~ Cakes
T~ Chicken
T~ Chocolate
T~ Chocolates
T~ Coffee
T~ Coffee Lovers
T~ Cooking
T~ Cooking Tips
T~ Cooking Utensils
T~ Diet
T~ Elder Care
T~ Festival
T~ Food
T~ Food Gifts
T~ Food Storage
T~ Grilling
T~ Hearing Aids
T~ Household Tips
T~ Indian Food
T~ Kids cooking
T~ Safety
T~ Sauna
T~ Soccer
T~ soya
T~ Valentine
T~ Vitamins
T~ Wine
T~Skin
Why I should write blog?
Archives
December 2005 (5)
January 2006 (27)
February 2006 (8)
March 2006 (13)
April 2006 (36)
May 2006 (16)
June 2006 (24)
July 2006 (23)
August 2006 (26)
September 2006 (26)
October 2006 (19)
November 2006 (14)
December 2006 (30)
January 2007 (28)
February 2007 (25)
March 2007 (25)
April 2007 (26)
May 2007 (31)
June 2007 (27)
July 2007 (28)
August 2007 (25)
September 2007 (29)
October 2007 (30)
November 2007 (28)
December 2007 (28)
January 2008 (27)
February 2008 (21)
March 2008 (28)
April 2008 (28)
May 2008 (28)
June 2008 (26)
July 2008 (26)
August 2008 (25)
September 2008 (26)
October 2008 (28)
November 2008 (25)
December 2008 (30)
January 2009 (29)
February 2009 (24)
March 2009 (26)
April 2009 (26)
May 2009 (12)
Search
Links
Smileys list
Terms & Conditions
Health Links 1
Health Links 2
Health Links 3
Health Links 4
Health Links 5
Measurement Conversion
Language
   

Read Articles To Me (Flash Reqired)

Other Talking Articles

Webmaster | 2. February 2009 @ 13:00

A common misconception, when it comes to Attention Deficit Disorder, is that it is one in the same with hyperactivity. However, this is far from the truth. While people with ADD may exhibit signs of hyperactivity, it is not an inherent trait of the disorder and often does not occur with sufferers of ADD.

Hyperactivity is a general term referring to excessive and/or pathological activeness. This term is often used erroneously for an active person that does not meet the excessive criteria. It is important to understand that all children are active to a certain extent, and that some are even extremely active. However, this does not necessarily constitute hyperactivity. A hyperactive person will seem to be driven to movement, making it almost impossible to sit still. If sitting, they will often fidget or talk excessively as a countermeasure. Hyperactivity is often difficult to assess in adults; however, children are much easier to diagnose.

Attention Deficit Disorder, on the other hand, is exhibited by inattentiveness, impulsiveness, and distractibility, but not necessarily hyperactivity. A child that suffers from ADD may have difficulty completing assignments, paying attention, and/or waiting their turn. In order for any of these behaviors to constitute a disorder, they must be extreme, create difficulty in completing daily activities, and not be appropriate behavior for the age group of the child. They must also occur for an extended period of time, at least six months and be identifiable prior to the age of 7 and continue thereafter.

However, some children with ADD also have hyperactivity, demonstrated as excessive fidgeting, running, and jumping at inappropriate times. They often seem to have an inability to be still. If a child exhibits hyperactivity in addition to Attention Deficit Disorder, they are often termed “ADHD”: Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. While many people assume the term ADD is an antiquated version of ADHD, they actually refer to two different types of disorders.

In all, there are typically three variations of ADD or ADHD. These are (1) inattentive type, (2) hyperactive-impulsive type, and (3) combination. Obviously the inattentive type exhibits a difficulty in paying attention and completing activities, but is not hyperactive. These children tend to be more difficult to diagnose. On the other hand, the hyperactive-impulsive type is extremely active and has a difficulty controlling their behavior. Of course, the third type is a combination of the two previous types and displays inattentiveness, hyperactivity, and impulsiveness.

About The Author: Sarah is an acclaimed writer on medical matters, and has written extensively on the subjects of Attention Deficit Disorder, Bird Flu and Crohn’s Disease . For more of her articles, go to http://www.imedicalvillage.com now.

HT ~ ADD :: Comments (0) :: Link
Webmaster | 16. December 2008 @ 13:00

Attention Deficit Disorder does not actually exist; it is an excuse to allow children to behave poorly and avoid discipline.

Great strides are being taken to fully understand ADD and its causes. However, there is no question it is a real disorder that is exhibited by inattention, impulsiveness, distractibility, and sometimes hyperactivity.

All children have poor attention spans and are hyperactive; therefore children diagnosed with ADD are just like any other child.

ADD causes excessive impulsiveness, inattention, distractibility and sometimes hyperactivity; the very nature of diagnosing ADD is that the behavior is more extreme than that of other children of the same age. While most children display these behaviors at some time, it does not normally hinder their day to day activities. Children with ADD have constant problems with these behaviors impeding their productivity on a daily basis.

Attention Deficit Disorder can be prevented through discipline or diet.

Because ADD is a biological and genetic disorder, diet and discipline are not causes. Many suggestions have been made that poor diet, fatty foods, and sugar are factors that cause the disorder; this is absolutely not the case. Likewise, lack of discipline does not cause ADD. In many cases a child with ADD has been excessively reprimanded to no avail.

All children with ADD are hyperactive

There is a common misconception that Attention Deficit Disorder inherently means a child is hyperactive; this is not true. Many children have the predominantly inattentive type of ADD, meaning the primary characteristic is lack of attention, short attention span, and distractibility. This type does not include hyperactivity as a symptom. ADD without hyperactivity is often more difficult to identify, as the children are usually just thought to be unproductive or lazy.

Most children outgrow ADD

Studies suggest that most children continue the symptoms of ADD throughout adolescence, and some even into adulthood. Exhibiting the same behaviors, these individuals will continue to show distractibility, difficulty in staying on task, and impulsiveness for many years.

There is nothing parents or teachers can do to control a child with ADD

This is simply not the case. The purpose of parents and teachers in dealing with a child with ADD should be to help teach them how to control their own actions. There are various ways to do this, including behavior modification, positive reinforcement procedures, and other techniques. While traditional discipline may be less effective, measures can be taken to help control an ADD child

About The Author: Sarah K. Jenkins is an acclaimed writer on medical matters, and has written extensively on the subjects of Attention Deficit Disorder, Bird Flu and Cohns Disease. For more of her articles, go to http://www.imedicalvillage.com now.

HT ~ ADD :: Comments (0) :: Link